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israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists remain gathered at the border with gaza. israel threatening to take the next step if if hamas doesn't stop the rocket fire into israel. the next step ground troops moving in. we want to bring in ambassador dennis ross, served as adviser to four presidents and is a mideast diplomacy analyst. it's great to have you with me today. big news coming within the last hour, al jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk
assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to solve issues through negotiations which broke down two years ago. on the heels of the recent violent clashes between gaza and israel is now the right time for this vote? >> well, it's a fate acomply that the vote is going to take place. it's been in the works for some time before -- really the bigger issue is how will the parties react after it? there's been a calm reaction to far. there should be one. they need to
this morning. it's changing by the minute out of israel. this morning israeli tv reporting three israelis were killed in rocket strikes in the southern part of the country. this comes as the israeli military has launched an aggressive new campaign to cripple hamas after repeated rocket attacks. as many as 750 this year, they say, launched from gaza into southern israel. last night president obama spoke on the phone with prime minister benjamin netanyahu acknowledging israel's right to defend itself but also urging him to not have civilian casualties. this youtube video showing an air strike yesterday killing the top military commander of hamas. it was part of a widespread campaign against targets that the israeli military says it will broaden in the coming days. this morning defense forces dropped leaflets over gaza warning residents to stay away from hamas operatives. on twitter, a clear message from israeli defense forces. quote, we recommend that no hamas operatives, whether low level or senior leaders, show their faces above ground in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night w
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
in the middle east, where the fragile truce between israel and gaza hamas rulers appears to be holding 19 hours after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying
crossings. benjamin netanyahu met with ban ki-moon and said israel is open to a long-term solution. >> if a long-term solution can be put in place through diplomatic means israel would be a willing partner. >> this is, obviously, a fluid situation, my friends. we are awaiting more word from gaza from our correspondents there. just in terms of the optics and where the white house is on this, the facts, sam, that hillary clinton left her last international trip with the president to go and be present for what may be a cease-fire, certainly sends a message as far as how close we may be to a deal and the fact that the white house knows it needs to be more active in this situation. >> they wouldn't send her out there for it to suddenly dissolve too more chaos. it would look foolish for them to do that. we're get close to a cease-fire. let's not lose sight of sort of the short-term story line for the long-term consequences of this. and by that i mean, we're negotiating a cease-fire, not a peace agreement and this white house has been unable to really forge through. if anything, it's sort
.s. says it won't help its bid to establish a palestinian stateside by side with israel. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n. outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because no matter what happens at the united nations, it will not produce the outcome that this government -- this president and certainly i strongly support. >> nbc's martin fletcher is live for us in tel aviv. martin, it's nothing new that israel ends up losing p.r. battles with the united nations. this is sort of what's happened over the years. this was a vote that was actually delayed almost a year -- the united states successfully delayed this vote for a long time. what's going to happen today? >> reporter: well, the united states tried to delay this vote, too, very strongly and also israel. what's going to happen today is they're going to lose. it's going to be a bit of a slap in the face for the united states after having tried to persuade the palestinian leader not to take this vote. the palestinians it seems will have an overwhelming support in the
. hamas, which the u.s. and israel consider a terror organization initially -- essentially runs the gaza strip, the palestinian militants there have already begun retaliations firing rocket after rocket across the border into israel. and now the potential of another conflict. in a region already dealing with a bloody civil war in neighboring syria. leland i have the materiality along the israeli/gaza border with more. leland? >> tonight, shepard, we can hear the unmistakable sound of israeli f-16s starting their bombing runs into the gaza strip. you then see the bright flashes of light when those 2000 pound bombs go off and you hear the reverb rations of the explosions at the same time we are also seeing those rockets fly out of the gaza strip here in to southern israel. this attack on ahmed really caught hamas by great surprise. not only the intelligence required to carry out such a pinpoint strike but also the fact that israel has begun its targeted killings once again a number of militants met their end today. hamas and islamic jihad. weapons storng facilities were attacked including
east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
bogus items. syria used distraction of fighting between israel and palestinians to resupply government troops in syria. correspondent leland vittert has the evidence. >> bretevidence >> reporter: they have been firing off and appearing ready for battle. the western intelligence sources tell fox news the men are ire rainian revolutionary guard troops coming to help bashar assad in the syria long civil war. they have exploited the attention on syria to ramp up the flight. often sending ton of ammunition, weapon and equipment multiple times a week. they are flying via rocky air space. the u.s. put pressure on iraq. iraq is inspecting the planes but sources say it's done on the return flight. when the plane is empty to appease the u.s. keep the flight coming. 18 months since the civil war. deflection from the syrian army means that assad has less well-trained men. >> recent rebel takeover have robbed the soldiers of equipment. and the army is running low on ammunition. >> while diplomatic pressure from united states is the only thing to stop iran shipments via iraqi air space, in israel th
of riffs, netanyahu in israel bet on the wrong horse. he all but endorsed mitt romney for president. even beforehand, he was pretty snippy as far as far as an american, i resented his personal criticisms of president obama. is -- now that president obama's running for re-election is there a riff between israel and the united states? >> there's something of a rift and there's also a rift inside israel with many of netanyahu's critics arguing that he went too far. he never should do this. you never choose sides in american politics. why would he? >> bill: he should have known better than that. >> i was just at a j street gathering where they were going over the results of the election. >> bill: j street being? >> a progressive pro israel organization so it stands for israel and for a state solution. they work actively on achieving middle east peace. they were looking what happened with the israel vote. a big effort of netanyahu and conservatives in america was to make israel a wedge issue. to split voters off. it fail
, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a five-year-old siege and blockade on gaza. palestinians say that is unacceptable. that it has to be an
with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have here is the u.n. upgrading later today the status of the palestinians here. they are in effect going to become sort of a state within a group of states. but really, as you mentioned, they won't have the right to vot
. new york congressman steve israel as well as my man that i like to talk about in the future of the republican party, mike murphy. righto my first reads. it took president obama exactly 12 minutes longer to win his second term than a first one. we called the 2000 race at 11:00. this time at 11:12 p.m. we're not even 12 hours removed from that moment yet and it's clear that the second obama term will face enormous challenges in trying to resolve the country's if iscal future and create a governing coalition to make that happen in washington but, first, let's look at how the president made his victory happen. the president put together a decisive electoral college victory winning at least 303 votes to romney's 206 and at this hour in florida where the president leads by it looks like at this moment 50,000 votes, remains too close to call where we think the vote remains should favor the president. those folks in miami-dade are going to start counting votes when they get to work this morning. but those margin of victory was smaller than in 2008. in the end demographics and a stro
cooperation between israel and gaza in the near future. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza, for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end. a broader calm returned. the people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> this news comes after more than a week of violence that claimed 140 palestinian and 5 israeli lives. obviously, this day belongs to the israelis and palestinians. but americans should also look at today as proof that we got it right on election day. i want you to take a look at that scene again. that moment lasted just a few minutes. but it represents a week of slow, deliberate diplomacy by the president, secretary clinton and obama's foreign policy team. and a lot of patience. there was no sabre rattling, no caustic words, no cheap shots. for that you needed to turn to the republicans. >> if this god forbid conflict escalates, again, it is a sign of american weakness throughout the region. before in crises henry kissinger or jim
israel. the general assembly of the united nations is almost certain to grant the palestinians a status upgrade. this is a step that palestinians hope will eventually lead to recognition as an independent state. take a look at the crowd that's gathered there. this is yasser arafat square in ramallah. ♪ their president mahmoud abbas live. the vote is scheduled to be happening two and a half hours from now. this is something that israel and the u.s. have spent months lobbying against. i want to bring in jim clancy to put this in perspective here from cnn international. jim, first of all, what does this mean in very plain terms, for the palestinians if they get this upgraded status at the u.n., the significance? >> somebody calls them a state. they are allowed to join international organizations. they're even allowed to join the international criminal court. now, this is what worries israel and the united states because in doing so, they could file complaints with the court about the occupation, how palestinians are being treated. right now they have no such recourse. this is what could
. their relationship goes back years and years and years. in fact, i was reading one of the israeli newspapers. israel today ran no fewer than four opinion pieces just yesterday endorsing romney. what happens now, christiane, in this relationship between netanyahu and obama? >> well, what happens now is that obama is the president of the united states. netanyahu is the prime minister of israel. and they have to work together. these are two countries which stand side by side. there in no doubt in anybody's mind that the united states stands firmly for the security of israel, the intercommunity knows. it yes, there has been a cool relationship between netanyahu and obama, however netanyahu did congratulate the president this morning and said the strategic reliance between israel and the u.s. is stronger than ever. i will continue to work with president obama in order to assure the interests that are vital to the security of the citizens of israel. so, again, no doubt where the united states stands the strong security and protection of israel. the real issue of course that has divided them, one, iran. a
from israel and the united states about that possibility next. >>> and an alternative to putting your aging parents in a nursing home. a brand new option in assisted living that lands much closer to home. from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. jon: thousands of palestinians are celebrating in the streets of west bank when the u.n. gets ready to whether recognize the palestinian authority as nonmember observer state at u.n. david lee miller live in jerusalem with more on that. >> reporter: jon, in anticipation of this vote the pal steps are indeed joyous. they're not only celebrating on the west bank. they're also celebrating in amass-controlled gaza. they carried with them photos of mahmoud abbas. hamas which previously opposed u.n. vote is now endorsing it. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly. abbas met with officials and turned down the bid for upgraded u.n. status. israel is trying t
that would boost their status on the world stage. the united states and israel have lobbied hard against the move warning it could backfire and actually set back palestinian hopes for full statehood and negotiated peace. but with some key european nations on board, palestinians view the vote as a game changer. cnn's frederik pleitgen reports from the west bank city of ramallah. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york, palestinian president mahmoud abass addressing supporters. the final decision is to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observers state in the united states and the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assemb assembly, the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican. its territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to rectify a grave historical unjustice that the palestinians had undergone beginning with the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> reporte
him to account for what he does domestically and regionally. >> in cairo today delegations from israel and hamas are there for indirect talks to work on details beyond the initial cease-fire. i have a list of topics they're expected to cover, opening border crossings, easing israel's economic blockade and what do you expect from these discussions today? what are the chances any progress will be made? >> i think these already tough discussions. all the leverage that comes with having the military action on going is gone now. the pressure to make tough concessions and compromises is diminished and morsi is very distracted biz his own domestic crisis. i think you can have these talks go on for some time without major changes and that sets up the prospect for more conflict in the future. >> during this time if it takes awhile will the cease-fire hold? >> i think right now neither side has interest and i think more israel if iran starts to rearm hamas very quickly and i think they will see that as an untenable situation and it is possible you could over the next weeks see a resumption in so
israel wants the army corps of engineers. they can go into baghdad and kabul and turn lie itself on, it's time for them to come to new york and finish the job the utility company hasn't been able to. >> gregg: peter, thanks very much. >> heather: power restoration, that is one of concerns for some of those still struggling to get back on their feet. nicole, an assemblywoman from hard hit staten island. she joins us now. thank you so much for joining us. the district you represent there in staten island was one of the hardest hit in the flood zone. 60% of that district devastated, you said? >> yes. i represent the whole east shore of staten island. we have been very hard hit. my constituents have been struggling over the last 11 days. >> heather: what are some of the most immediate needs right now? >> right now, electricity is a major issue. we have 7500 that do not have electricity. the temperature went up to 50s so it's not as bad but there will be cold nights since this storm hit. electricity is definitely a priority of my office. those are calls i've been receiving most about electri
's relationship with, israel. a live report from jerusalem on that, martha. martha: with the election over both sides are talking about compromise on capitol hill right now. can we expect that? as washington comes back and gets down to business. tell me what you think about that. send me a tweet @marthamaccallum. can we expect some deal-making? we'll be back. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios bill: there is new violence in the streets of athens, greece. watch here. the [shouting]. bill: rioters are back and out in force on the streets of athens hurling firebombs at police as the parliament there okays new austerity measures to get hands on vital bailout money, money that it needs. amy kellogg live in london this. amy? >> reporter: bill, as you can see the situation is bad. that is violence that flared
of israel" that egypt can affect and lead the process of building democratic and constitutional regime that will become a dream for african and southern hemisphere. the group wants to make shariah law main source of the constitution. election is in the books but some d.c. voters might have mistakenly shown up to vote today. local media reports say tuesday morning nearly 2,000 district voters receive democratic robo calls telling them to vote tomorrow. as in wednesday. the democratic party says the foul-up happened because a vendor recycled a message from the day before. the party says the call was rerecorded and the entire list of 100,000 infrequent or new d.c. voters were recalled and urged to vote tuesday instead. >>> election day in america is viewed with considerable interest around the world. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg shows us from london. >> mr. speaker, the house will join me in congratulating president obama on the election victory. >> europeans overwhelmingly wanted to see president obama return to the white house. the special edition of the front page s
biased israel view. i can tell you what is going on. i love president assad. i stand with them. there has always been peace there. the women wear jeans, they'd drive, they vote. it is more of a democracy and a lot of ways and here. host: what do you think policy should be regarding syria? 5000 people killed in the uprising. caller: those rebels are not syrian. they were planted there. it is really funny. when obama put troops into israel, i think he did all of this for reelection. i am relieved mitt romney did not get elected even though i did not vote for either. i think obama might do the right thing and cut ties with israel. host: we will go to a report actually on syrian president assad. this in "usa today." he said "i am not a puppet." we have a few minutes left on the first segment of "the washington journal." we will go to pete in rhode island on the democrat line. caller: good morning. i would like to see him focus on the economy. host: specifically what part? caller: let's go with the fiscal cliff coming up. my thoughts were my belief is, and i hope somebody calls and corrects me
to supporters on capitol hill. she was joined by representative steve israel and congressman steny hoyer of maryland. >> it is going to be a good evening. our president is going to be our president. steve israel is assuring me we will pick up states in the house and yes, we think we're going to take back the house. i am so pleased to be year. -- to be here. we are fighting for the priorities our country knows are important. for the values that this country knows is critically important. for investing in education, in growing our jobs in america, in investing in protecting our environment and investing in the health care of our people. americans believe lyonesse priorities. i want to congratulate my friend steve israel for the extraordinary job he has done. i have gone through this country, i have been in almost 90 districts, 89 districts in this country. campaigning with extraordinary candidates. some incumbents khomeni challengers. they are extraordinary people who will do an excellent, outstanding job as a members of the congress. steve israel has set an objective. he has worked hard a
your pick, libya, showdown between iran and israel and syria. why would the voters say this election matters more than most? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile. you can post a comment on the blog there. or you can go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i guess they're all important. but the interest in this was particularly high. >> it was very intense. and obviously people out there want to know more. that's what we're going to try to give them. thanks very much, jack, for that. >> sure. >> there's also no doubt that this election clearly mattered for minorities, most of whom came out in droves for the president surprising those who predicted many would stay home. lisa sylvester's working this part of the story for us. lisa, you've got some new details as well. >> yeah, wolf, if you look at the exit poll data, what comes out clear as day is that president obama had the youth vote and the minority vote. and that's part one. but the second half of that is that voter turnout in the key swing states, african-americans either met the turnout rate of 2008 or in the case of ohio
made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his election victory. fort lauderdale, florida. independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. host: did you vote yesterday or early in florida? caller: a voted early. actually, i went out and did some last minute can the scene for the present, and i will tell you -- can this -- canvassing for the president. i always try to keep myself informed, and one of the things i realized about mitt romney is although he was a good businessman, the businesses that he had or businesses that he consolidated and got rid of jobs. so, we also had another businessman that was a president, hoover, and the country went into a depression. we have a businessman, george bush, that was the president, and our country almost went into a depression after that. people have to realize that when our elected officials are irresponsible by saying we have to be like a household, the government is not run like our household. that is totally ridiculous. it is absol
, but come without the support of israel or the united states. >> as for the rights of the jewish people in this land, i have a simple message for those gathered in the general assembly today. no decision by the u.n. can break the 4,000-year-old bond between the people of israel and the land of israel. >> the palestinians have had a permanent observer status at the u.n. since 1974, when the palestinian liberation organization oh was recognized as an observer, a position which is not defined in the u.n.'s charter. >>> and for the first time since the election, president barack obama and governor mitt romney will meet. they're going to have lunch at the white house. before that happens, romney will meet with his former running mate, congressman paul ryan. >>> former baltimore orioles doug de census is indicted on insider trading. money laundering for a stock sale in 2008. the feds claim decinces bought $160,000 of stock in a medical device company and sold it for $1.3 billion after a friend alerted him to a takeover bid. >>> let's talk -- real sports now. they say you can't lose your job t
what the middle east peace deal is going to be. that is a matter between israel and the palestinians, and the u.s. can nudge and between and all of that. but in the end, if netanyahu and the palestinians are not in the position to bring resolution to this, then at it is not really going to be something that president obama can do. certainly something he would like very much to do. netanyahu -- i mean, now that the election is over, i think we will see prime minister netanyahu have a recalculation of the relationship with obama and how it has to go forward. it has not been close in the previous four years. it has been pragmatic and grudgingly accepting a reality on both sides, but there is an opportunity for that to change. host: do you have thoughts on that, scott? guest: just a follow-up. netanyahu had a personal relationship with romney and was a very secret about who he wanted to win the election and that was not president obama, who applied quite a bit of pressure to israel in his first term to try to secure a peace deal called israel settlements in the west bank. israel felt sor
. they could not celebrate this success without the leadership of steve israel, the chair. when i asked him to take this responsibility to serve our country and colleagues, i i said to all of you that he is a gold standard of a member of congress. he knows the policy. he cares about american people. that drives him to do the politics to increase our numbers to pass legislation that takes us for to improve the lives of americans. before i bring him on, i wanted to have a representative of the freshman class to speak on behalf of the class. i am very honored to welcome a fighter for the middle class, a real representative of his generation, congressman alec patrick murphy. his election is a cuase for celebration. his election sends the message to a new generation of americans that their voices will be heard at the table. congratulations, congressman a -elect, patch of mercy. -- patrick murphy. >> thank you for your leadership and for being here with us. thank you for your support. my name is patrick murphy from florida district 18. the youngest member of congress. i did defeatists someone you
their strong support for the state of israel. i wouldn't say every mailing we sent out, but just about every mailing that we sent out mentioned either obama removing jerusalem as the capital of israel from his platform and then belatedly reinserting it, or it mentioned his call for israel to return to '67 borders, or it mentioned the fact that his administration had slow-walked sanctions against iran. and those issues have real resonance among pro-israel evangelicals. >> jonathan saw hasn't is one of washington's most thoughtful journalists. he's been covering this sector for a long time, and thank you, ralph, for your comments. he is the money and politics reporter for bloomberg, and he's also the past president of the national press club. what did you see yesterday, and what does it mean for the country? >> well, in 2010 we saw all this secret money into the races, and the republicans took control of the senate and the house, and all observers said this is just going to be a foreshadowing of 2012. it wasn't. obama was able to raise as much money as romney. romney had help with some of the
one nation that we should be nation-building with, and that's israel. because israel -- israel is -- that's god's chosen land. the jews are god's chosen people. host: ok, connie, let's give fred barnes a chance to comment. guest: well, i mean that was an issue between romney who was much more pro israel though publicly in particular. we'll see how that turns out. i personally don't begrudge him a vacation after the campaign, like to take one myself. but there was another part -- oh, yeah. what she said in the beginning about the republican party. is it really in deep trouble? i don't think so. obviously hispanics are a problem. younger senators and governors, they have 30 governors who are extremely important, 30 out of 50. like bob mcdonald in virginia and bobby jindal and scott walker in wisconsin and so on. republicans actually -- romney actually won i believe the middle class. if you have the middle class as people who make between $50,000 a year and $100,000 a year, romney won that group narrowly. the middle class is up for grabs but romney did well enough there but just n
israel launched an operation against militants in benghazi, killing hamas's military chief. as for the economy, the retail sales fell in october, first decline in three months. that's it from cnbc, first in business worldwide. now back to "hardball." >>> do you think photo i.d. would have made any difference? the outcome of this election? >> yes, i think so. we're looking at all sorts of different precincts and all sorts of same-day registrations. people will go on, we don't have fraud and abuse in our election, but why couldn't we have voter i.d. when majority of our people in wisconsin want it, the governor signed it. why should one judge be able to hold it up? >> there you have the problem with the republican party. pay a lot of attention to that what that woman just said, senate senator. that's the state -- state senator wisconsin, i don't know her, served as mitt romney's co-chair in the state and now she's saying suppressing the voter i.d. cards would have made the difference in wisconsin. let's look at the facts. apparently she's not interested in the fact. obama won
syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile. but we do think it is it's a broad-based representative group. one of the questions we're going to continue to express is making sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have to be on gourd about, particularly when wi
, as will the head of the d triple c, chairman johns for the house races, steve israel of new york, news conference coming at 2:00 eastern. we'll likely have it for you here on c-span as the house is expected to gavel out quickly at 2:00. >> what i like about c-span's coverage is it's in-depth. oftentimes you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch the communicators, i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking. i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. the lame duck session starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. until then part of this morning's "washington journal." host: we are back with the former senator from indiana served as democrat for that state from 1999 to 2011. now co-founder of the no labels organization. senator bayh, let me begin with the petraeus resignation. what's your reaction? you served on the intelligence
? >> they didn't support romney. they were encouraged by obama. >> stephanie: there is trouble now with israel and that never happened before. >> back in 1972 richard nixon denied anything to do with a low level--had the press not been aggressive nixon would have gotten away with it. and the break in the watergate hotel was not nearly as important as failing to define a terrorist attack that killed four americans. obama made a mistake not getting ahead of the story. he should have given the facts weeks ago and the press let him get away with it, but now the heat is coming down, as it should. >> stephanie: i heard this on limbaugh. worse than watergate. worse than watergate. third rate burglary. >> if i had a nickel every time the far right said something obama did was worse than watergate. >> stephanie: clearly. jim, what are you going to say? >> it can be a terror attack that was inspired by that stupid movie. >> stephanie: which is what people on the ground said. >> it's not one or the other. >> stephanie: i don't dwelt get where this scandal is coming from. all these factors have been repor
among your constituents? the republicans and romney tried to say that the president through israel under the bus. that was the argument and romney made it at the republican convention. >> i think the reason that the president got 70% of the jewish vote, is because womens health, civil liberties, that's a natural home, and we were able to make sure the lies and distortions that they tried to sew were not working. >> john boehner today in his speech, he had a conciliatory tone, and he said the american people expect us to find common ground and we're willing to accept some additional revenue via tax reform. what's going to happen? >> i was happy to see an olive branch. president obama had the kitchen sink thrown at him, but incite of that, voters voted to move forward, and we need to recognize that balanced approach the president talked about in the campaign is what we need to work together towards. >> you sound on mptimistic. >> i am. >> an exciting lame duck session. >> still ahead, a nor'easter is pounding the same areaing pounded by superstorm sandy. [ woman ] it's 32 minutes to go tim
and, of course, that goes to the effect of israel difficult choices. and even at 28%, you know, there was a bit of resistance. i do think it shows that you, that the president not only is open to reform ideas, he's included a significant reform idea in his budget, which raises a half a trillion dollars over the next 10 years. >> i'm going ask you about the other tough choices because we're short on time already. entitlement programs. i know you're not going to negotiate here in front of us but if this president -- >> gee, i really was ready to but you're probably right. >> i will give you the opportunity. is this president prepared to move further when it comes to medicare come specifically, when he sits down with john boehner than he was back in the debt ceiling negotiations almost two years ago? >> well, you're right. i'm not going to start doing that negotiation. what i would say is that the president, in his budget, put forward 360 billion in health savings. the president understands that health reform, entitlement reform is going to be part of this package. he's been very
, as far as i can tell. it's the only thing they agree on. >> israel, not so much. >> if you were in europe, misery loves company. >> there will be nothing left, but we'll give you everything. join us. join us so we don't feel so bad about ourselves. >> did you read the op ed in the journal this morning? >> i got in at ten until. >> about givers and takers. they said this was not an election that was ultimately about givers and takers. >> it was about social issues. >> but the givers and takers thing i thought was probably the most remarkable line given that it was "the wall street journal." >> so they're backtracking off of that? >> on that piece. the republic will survive piece? >> yeah, the republic will survive piece. i have yet to start paying attention to "the wall street journal" editorial page and i'm not going to start now. >> right now, let's go to hampton pearson joining us from mitt romney's headquarters in boston. hampton, what can you tell us? >> well, becky, it is a proverbial morning after, and as we all watched the battle for the electoral college unfold last night, what wa
that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings that are going to be taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we are not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is to make sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements put themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have t
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